The Future of Marketing…Facial Recognition?

Posted by Steve Kleber on Oct 06, 2011

Welcome to the Kleber & Associates blog! Here’s the latest onThe Future of Marketing…Facial Recognition.


Remember when we talked about the facial expression reader, an application that collects data about a participant’s facial expressions when watching video ads? Marketers are speculating that this technology – facial recognition – could be the next big thing in marketing. Imagine if experiences were customized based on how you look when reacting to something? If you doubt this clever technology, think about this: some say that facial recognition is already woven into our everyday lives. Take Facebook, for example, which uses facial recognition to automate tagging when photographs are loaded onto the site.

This technology can be leveraged in other ways, too. Studies have shown that when faced with too many choices, buyers will gravitate toward familiar sources. Marketers can use this to their advantage by gaining successful marketing results.

Consider these examples of situations that, when outfitted with facial recognition, could offer consumers convenience:

  1. Ditch the password and login to social platforms by simply using your face. Just a glance to your computer’s camera, and you’re in.
  2. Walk into a coffee shop, and the barista already knows what you want based on past visits and what you look like.
  3. Receive a coupon for instant use on your mobile device when you enter a favorite retail location.
  4. Turn on the television and receive a playlist of suggestions based on past use.
  5. Login to video games and begin playing spontaneously.

Although most consider facial recognition scary (hello privacy!), marketers can’t get past the myriad of possibilities, especially the chance to get to know their customers on a deeper level.

What do you think? Is facial recognition a complete invasion of privacy, or is it a chance to help consumers develop a personal relationship with their favorite brands?

This entry was posted by Steve Kleber on Thursday, October 6th, 2011 at 8:19 am and is filed under Marketing, Public Relations, Research. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.